No going back from suddenly becoming a caregiver

There are a few basic truths that reveal themselves in almost every story of sudden-onset caregiving. The first is that love remains intact

No going back from suddenly becoming a caregiverFalling into caregiving is a particularly apt descriptor for anyone whose spouse has suffered a stroke or received a cancer diagnosis. The day of a loved one’s serious head injury is the marker for a family life before and after caregiving. A catastrophic event or diagnosis catapults a caregiver into another land – a territory…

Caregivers mustn’t be afraid to ask for help

While care for those we love creates meaningful experiences, it can also lead to exhaustion, isolation and burnout. We need to welcome help

Caregivers mustn’t be afraid to ask for helpCanada’s 8.1 million natural caregivers frequently hear their friends, family, neighbours and co-workers say, “Don’t hesitate to let me know if there is anything I can do to help.” The automatic verbal response from the caregiver if often a grateful, “Sure, will do.” But that rarely happens. Instead there’s hesitance, reluctance or even a refusal…

Five (bad) assumptions caregivers must overcome

These assumptions can harm caregivers over time. Happiness and fulfilment are emotions that must be generated from within

Five (bad) assumptions caregivers must overcomeMost people who say ‘Yes’ to caring for someone they love begin with a set of assumptions. And those assumptions can harm us over time. Here’s why. Bad assumption: My role is to give care. Why do we believe that caregivers only give care? Of course, there is one person in a care relationship who will…

No going back from suddenly becoming a caregiver

There are a few basic truths that reveal themselves in almost every story of sudden-onset caregiving. The first is that love remains intact

No going back from suddenly becoming a caregiverFalling into caregiving is a particularly apt descriptor for anyone whose spouse has suffered a stroke or received a cancer diagnosis. The day of a loved one’s serious head injury is the marker for a family life before and after caregiving. A catastrophic event or diagnosis catapults a caregiver into another land – a territory…

Growing number of seniors lack support of family, friends

Unbefriended,’ these isolated seniors require more help to safeguard their access to basic daily needs, including companionship, and improve their quality of life

Growing number of seniors lack support of family, friendsBy Stephanie A. Chamberlain and Carole A. Estabrooks University of Alberta What happens when a person grows older and can no longer make health and financial decisions for themselves – but also doesn’t have family or friends who can make those decisions on their behalf? Health and social services use a hard-hitting term to describe…

Women more likely to put careers on hold to care for loved ones

CIBC study says 30% of women have reduced or stopped saving as a direct result of care responsibilities

Women more likely to put careers on hold to care for loved onesA new study by CIBC says 69 per cent Canadian women make significant financial sacrifices, including putting their careers on hold to care for loved ones, which can put them at a considerable disadvantage to men when it comes to saving for their retirement. The study also found that 30 per cent of women say they've…

Address your fear of dying, express end-of-life care wishes

As physicians, we see death made worse and more painful every day by poor advance care planning

Address your fear of dying, express end-of-life care wishesBy Paul Hébert and George Heckman Canadian Frailty Network Are you or a loved one aging, perhaps with a chronic heart or lung condition that limits daily activities? Do you have an older parent in a nursing home or who needs assistance with daily living activities? If so, read on and make the pledge. As…

Navigating health and social system a challenge to caregivers

The time it takes caregivers to navigate medical and social care systems may surprise many health policy analysts, but not caregivers

Navigating health and social system a challenge to caregiversBy Amélie Quesnel-Vallée and Miles Taylor EvidenceNetwork.ca The Canadian population is aging. For the first time, Canadians 65 years and over outnumber those 14 years and under. To face this major demographic change head on, we need to adapt. In particular, to meet the preferences of the great majority of Canadians who want to age in the…