Killer T cells could ignite immune response against cancer: study

Research brings cancer-killing cells to bear against a certain type of colorectal cancer tumour

Killer T cells could ignite immune response against cancer: studyA University of Alberta researcher has discovered how two signalling molecules recruit immune cells known as killer T cells to a specific type of colon cancer with more favourable patient outcomes. The finding may represent a therapeutic strategy to target other types of cancers. Kristi Baker, assistant professor in the Department of Oncology, examined tumours…

Four U of A researchers named to Royal Society of Canada

Innovators in women and children’s health, water safety, nutrition and archeology join ranks

Four U of A researchers named to Royal Society of CanadaWhy some are more susceptible to cardiovascular disease than others, even when taking into account life-modifying factors like smoking and exercise, boils down to developmental aspects that start in the womb, according to a global authority on vascular pathophysiology in the pregnancy complication of pre-eclampsia. “It sets the stage,” said Sandra Davidge, Distinguished University Professor in…

Students help groups improve programs through evaluation

Week-long course leads to better impact for community groups and work-integrated skill-building for students

Students help groups improve programs through evaluationIt’s become a truism in business that you can’t manage what you don’t measure. That’s why students in the University of Alberta’s School of Public Health are keen to take a unique course that gives them hands-on experience helping community groups evaluate their programs. And it’s why those community groups are lining up to get the help.…

Marker may predict response to cancer immunotherapy

Abundance of protein galectin-9 in cancer patients is associated with poor response to immunotherapy

Marker may predict response to cancer immunotherapyUniversity of Alberta researchers have uncovered a link between the expression of the protein galectin-9 (gal-9) and whether a cancer patient will benefit from immunotherapy. The discovery could help inform physicians about which patients will likely respond to immunotherapy and lead to better treatment options. Immunotherapy or biological therapy is the treatment of disease by…

Fitness program encourages kids with heart disease to train safely at home

Cardiologists, computing scientists team up to build video game-based MedBIKE fitness program for pediatric heart patients

Fitness program encourages kids with heart disease to train safely at homeZacharie Biollo, 16, was born with a ventricle missing in his heart and had three life-saving surgeries by the time he was three years old. As he grew up, his parents encouraged him to get involved in sports such as soccer and karate, but he found he ran out of breath faster than some other…

Pediatric heart transplant method allows for better outcomes

Blood-type-incompatible heart transplant surgery for infants under the age of two pioneered in Canada, now used worldwide

Pediatric heart transplant method allows for better outcomesA pediatric heart transplant procedure pioneered by Canadian doctors – once deemed impossible – has been shown to be at least as effective as the traditional approach, according to newly published research in The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health. ABO-incompatible heart transplantation was developed in the mid-1990s, after a Canadian transplant team led by Lori West realized that infants…

Machine learning used to predict early symptoms of schizophrenia

Researchers develop AI tool to analyze brain scans, identify risk for earlier diagnosis and treatment

Machine learning used to predict early symptoms of schizophreniaUniversity of Alberta researchers have taken another step forward in developing an artificial intelligence tool to predict schizophrenia by analyzing brain scans. In recently published research, the tool was used to analyze functional magnetic resonance images of 57 healthy first-degree relatives (siblings or children) of schizophrenia patients. It accurately identified the 14 individuals who scored highest…

How baby’s first breath triggers life-saving changes in the brain

Discovery may help explain cases of sudden infant death syndrome

How baby’s first breath triggers life-saving changes in the brainAt the moment of birth, the essential role of delivering life-saving oxygen to the baby switches from mom and her placenta to the baby’s lungs and brain. That the timing of this happens so precisely is miraculous, but how it happens remains largely a mystery. New research from the University of Virginia School of Medicine, in…

Canada must invest in better emergency care for children

A program based in Manitoba is working to share the vast knowledge and evidence produced at children’s hospitals across the country

Canada must invest in better emergency care for childrenWhen a child is sick or injured, our health system usually delivers excellent care. Yet the adage that “children are not small adults” – and have specific medical needs – reflects the challenge still facing most Canadian emergency departments. Each year in Canada, approximately 1.8 million acutely ill and injured children will visit an emergency…