The pursuit of happiness

The truth is, you can't find happiness – it finds you, based on your pursuit of things that bring fulfilment and peace

The pursuit of happinessA student recently passed by my classroom and asked, “Mr. Chidiac, why are you always so happy?” I replied, “I love what I do. I love being a teacher.” She seemed satisfied and went on her way. I thought further about what she asked and my response. I really am extremely happy and I suppose…

Have island, will rusticate

Interest in owning islands is on the rise. Are people seeking the quiet life or simply trying to escape societal woes?

Have island, will rusticateBorn and raised to the age of eight in the largest, noisiest, sharpest-elbowed city in Canada, I gave no thought to the pastoral life of country folk I’d occasionally see on CBC television during the supper hour. All that began to change in 1971 when my father managed to acquire a 10-acre piece of land…

Four steps to a better economic future

Rather than pursue a "future" based on past practices, governments should be working towards a future based on equity, well-being and sound environmental management

Four steps to a better economic future“The power of creating a better future is contained in the present moment: you create a good future by creating a good present.” – Eckhart Tolle Emerging conditions mean we’re likely to face a large global recession in the next two to three years. Part of the reason is the significant and substantial growth of…

Come on, get happy: if a survey says we are, it must be true

Apparently, as you get older you get happier. Sclerotic, arthritic, calcified, deaf, blind, stupid and poor equals happy? Where do I sign up?

Come on, get happy: if a survey says we are, it must be trueIn a few years, people my age will get back pain, clogged arteries, brittle bones, hearing loss, cataracts, arthritis, heart disease, dementia and schizophrenia. What they won’t get, apparently, is unhappy about it. Citing a recent national survey, Canadian Press reports that older people in this country are generally more buoyant than younger ones. In…

Money can’t buy happiness, yet we keep chasing it

Will more money mean we sleep better at night, spend more time with friends and family, or contribute more to society?

Money can’t buy happiness, yet we keep chasing itThere’s a story told that about a financial planner who was on holidays in Mexico. He was walking along the beach when he came to a fisherman sitting on a wharf, his feet hanging off the edge as he played guitar. “Is that your boat?” the planner asked the fisherman. “It is,” he replied. They…

Goals, interests key to achieving success and happiness

Developing interests and setting goals is the first step to leading a more fulfilling and rewarding life

Goals, interests key to achieving success and happinessIf I were to ask you what motivates you to get up in the morning, would you have some specific answers for me? Would you list your job, your family, some particularly enjoyable activity or a goal you are working toward? Frequently, my patients tell me they have no reason to get up in the…

Shop local: the value of an enriched human nudge

To make shopping local the norm, we need to think less about transaction efficiency and more about enjoyment

Shop local: the value of an enriched human nudgeChances are you’ve seen or heard some sort of promotion about the value of shopping local – especially with so many of us in gift-buying mode now. Business improvement areas, chambers of commerce and other organizations tell us when we buy from shops near home, we’re voting for our community. The logic is generally sound…

The secret to a long and happy life

Broader and better social interactions are key, according to researchers. So reach out to others

The secret to a long and happy lifePsychologist Susan Pinker tells us that the key to living a long life may not be eating well and getting exercise. Her research, and that of Julianne Holt-Lunstad, demonstrates that an emphasis on close personal relationships and face-to-face interactions is actually the top predictor of longevity. In other words, if we have friends and family…

Why marriage still matters

From health to wealth, from personal happiness to better outcomes for children, the benefits of traditional relationships are many

Why marriage still mattersBy Andrea Mrozek and Peter Jon Mitchell Cardus Canadian supporters of marriage are speaking up – and not a moment too soon. In a recent Angus Reid Institute survey, about 56 per cent of Canadians said, “marriage is simply not necessary” to form a lifelong relationship. Almost the same proportion (57 per cent) went on…